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Hosepipe ban in Lincolnshire remains despite heavy rainfall

By Lincolnshire Echo  |  Posted: April 26, 2012

  • A pedestrian getting wet at Willingham by Stow. Picture: Anna Draper

  • Flash flooding in Padmoor Lane, Upton, near Gainsborough

  • The high water level at The River Till near Sturton by Stow

  • Large puddles in Burton Road, Lincoln

  • A rainbow alongside in Tillbridge Lane, Sturton by Stow

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The hosepipe ban will not be lifted despite continuous rainfall since it was introduced.

Lincolnshire supplier Anglian Water says the shortage has been caused by long spells of dry weather and much more rain is needed.

The ban was introduced across many parts of the country on April 5.

Anglian Water spokesman Antony Innes said: "Recent rainfall is a relief for the environment, and no doubt our customers will have found it useful in the garden as well.

"However, we must keep in mind that this drought is the result of almost two years of below average rainfall, including two very dry winters – this is why the region's first hosepipe ban in more than 20 years was introduced.

"It is going to take more than a few wet weeks to reverse the impact of the prolonged periods of dry weather that we have experienced and allow the hosepipe ban to be lifted."

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  • yellowbelly19  |  April 26 2012, 11:53PM

    she looks like she's expecting it, how suspicious...

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  • Mr_Sneer  |  April 26 2012, 11:48PM

    "So do I. It's a motoring offence I think. Perhaps the photo could be enhanced to show the number." Judging by the size of the woman and her umbrella compared to the car, her lack of shadow and the monochrome and deeply unconvincing water splash, I'd say it's already been enhanced...

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  • SS29252  |  April 26 2012, 6:23PM

    "Hope she got that cars number." So do I. It's a motoring offence I think. Perhaps the photo could be enhanced to show the number.

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  • eatmygoal  |  April 26 2012, 5:03PM

    "you will find that an average year produces more than enough water for the country's requirements" That's kind of my point. Also you say we have a prolonged period of dry, this is incorrect. We have had a prolonged period of lower than average rainfall, in certain areas of England. "I am not going to go in to why the average is used as a base figure by which to compare things to" Go on, go into them because I don't get it. The way I view it is that we are traditionally awash with rain, it gives us our green and pleasant land. One which is still looking green and pleasant to me. Now we have less rain than the average, an average that is high because we have so much rain, and suddenly there are issues with supply. In business terms the Japanese used a model for supply managment. When the river runs full the issues on the river bed are hidden. However when it runs dry all are exposed. By that I mean now that we are actually pushed to be a bit more efficient we can see the issues that large rainfall has hidden. Re Grey water, it would be costly yes, and?

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  • M_C_Donald  |  April 26 2012, 4:38PM

    eatmygoal If you do your research you will find that an average year produces more than enough water for the country's requirements. There wet years and there are dry years and generaly one cancels out the other. This time we have had a pre-longed period of dry, hence the drought. I am not going to go in to why the average is used as a base figure by which to compare things to, because I don't think you are that dim. This is being reported as worst drought for 100 years. Things must of improved because we haven't seen standpipes in the streets like we did in 1976. You make a fair point about collecting 'grey water' for flushing toilets etc, but this would need double the infrastructure to pipe it to every household and business and at what cost? and if there is a drought this would run out too because you couldn't store that amount of water you would collect over the year.

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  • eatmygoal  |  April 26 2012, 3:51PM

    One of the things that gripes me with this, and links into other people's complaints of wastage, is from this quote "we must keep in mind that this drought is the result of almost two years of below average rainfall". Why is it that the average amount of rain is the amount we actually need? The amount of water England gets is significantly more than a great number of countries, so why is it that we have to always have our average or more in order to have enough? It is always worth baring in mind that the average amount of anything is almost never present so that there is lower than average for two years should be expected. Perhaps the "drought" could push thinking on things such as New Zealand's scheme where a lot of water is collecting locally by streets in big tanks to be used. Given the UKs issue with pollution in rain it could never be used to drink but it could flush a toilet or fill a central heating system. And that is something else, as I near the end of my rant, why does everything have to be up to drinking standard? I don't need to wash my clothes in water I could drink, or water my daffodils with it.

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  • Ian_Heighton  |  April 26 2012, 1:34PM

    No doubt they will soon be asking the regulator to put up prices to "manage the floods" and even more to "manage the drought". I remember after the 1970's drought a huge price increase to ensure it "never happens again". Ah well, at least they have enough money to give the executives a huge bonus, that's the most important thing.

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  • GusterLinc  |  April 26 2012, 12:13PM

    It would help if the water companies weren't losing 3.3 billion litres of water per day in leaks. Anglian Water itself loses 19% of its water through its leaking pipes. In the past 5 years, Anglian Water has been seen an increase in the % of water lost through leaks - they're actually getting worse!

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  • unmellowbelly  |  April 26 2012, 11:36AM

    The water company, the only people who can charge you for something and then tell you that you can't use what they have sold you..

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  • helgy2  |  April 26 2012, 10:53AM

    No Anglian water you have lost a years supply in the past 4 years through leaks so it's not strictly true that its all the fault of 2 dry winters. Why let the facts get in the way of not excepting you are to blame. To be fair all the 21 water boards have lost in the past 4 years one years of worth of supply to the whole of the UK.

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