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Hosepipe ban lifted in Lincolnshire

By LWallace_LE  |  Posted: June 13, 2012

Lincolnshire's water supplier lifts the hosepipe ban in the county.

Lincolnshire's water supplier lifts the hosepipe ban in the county.

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Anglian Water today revealed it is lifting its hosepipe ban, following three months of wet weather.

It has joined  Thames Water and Southern Water in announcing the restrictions will be officially lifted tomorrow.

Seven water companies across southern and eastern England brought in hosepipe bans to combat drought, after two unusually dry winters left some groundwater supplies and rivers as low as in the drought year of 1976.

But the restrictions introduced early in April were followed by record rainfall across the UK for that month, and more rain in May and the beginning of June.

A spokesman for Anglian Water, which supplies all households across Lincolnshire, said the decision had been made because of a combination of factors combining to ease pressure on the water system.

He said: "It's been because of supply and demand, it has recharged.

"It also is because we have had such a cold, wet May and June following a wet April, which means demand has been suppressed."

The heavy showers that have plagued Britain this week will continue through the rest of the week, with Wales and the South West worst affected.

Gemma Plumb, forecaster at MeteoGroup, the weather division of the Press Association, said today would see prolonged, fairly heavy showers across Wales and the South West.

She said there were "hints" further heavy and persistent rain will continue on Thursday evening and Friday morning but will not be as heavy as the start of the week.

All is not lost for a sunny summer though.

Ms Plumb said: "There are some hints of sun towards the end of the month but that is uncertain."

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  • eatmygoal  |  June 14 2012, 12:40PM

    M_C_Donald. It is a fair point, I have not been out to water my water logged garden down here and Thames Water have just removed the hosepipe ban. For me though it is the fact that I couldn't if I had wanted to, the same as when I am in Lincoln. The reason for that in my view is due to poor management which is only shown when we do have those periods where less rain falls for a time.

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  • eatmygoal  |  June 14 2012, 12:34PM

    And I responded to ask if it was relevant to the Anglian Water region, and sort of answered my own question, Yes it is.

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  • M_C_Donald  |  June 14 2012, 12:22PM

    In reality who in Lincolnshire has been inconvenienced by the hosepipe ban? We have had no need to water the garden and those of us too lazy to wash the car with a bucket (me included,) what is a couple of months with a grubby car?

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  • FreedomSpeech  |  June 14 2012, 11:46AM

    Ian talked about seven water company areas, not just the Anglian Water region. You responded to that and I responded to you.

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  • eatmygoal  |  June 13 2012, 2:37PM

    But is that relevant to the Anglian Water region or are their certain cities and areas driving it that lie outside of this region? This map is interesting, http://tinyurl.com/7h8lg54 Still wouldn't consider it an explosion but certainly interesting.

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  • FreedomSpeech  |  June 13 2012, 1:56PM

    http://tinyurl.com/cnnohwb 7 million, which is an increase of over 12%. Even given the time-frame, that's pretty explosive if you ask me.

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  • eatmygoal  |  June 13 2012, 1:34PM

    explosion?

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  • Ian_Heighton  |  June 13 2012, 12:40PM

    Seven water companies across southern and eastern England brought in hosepipe bans to combat drought, after two unusually dry winters left some groundwater supplies and rivers as low as in the drought year of 1976 Nothing to do with increased demand due to population explosion then?

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