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Hunt investigated after claim that hounds illegally chased foxes through a village

By This is Lincolnshire  |  Posted: January 25, 2011

Hunt investigated after claim that hounds illegally chased foxes through a village
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WILDLIFE crime officers are investigating to see whether hounds from a Lincolnshire hunt illegally chased foxes through a county village.

Police were called following a report that a pack of dogs had run across the back garden of a house in Coleby, south of Lincoln, at 12.15pm on Saturday - and that the animals were hot on the heels of a pair of foxes.

Police spokesman James Newall said they had been contacted by a family whose children had been playing in the garden and were left distressed by the incident.

"We are looking to see if an offence has been committed," he said.

Margaret Morris, a master of the Blankney Hunt, which was in the area at the time, said it had been an "unfortunate" and "isolated" incident.

"A few hounds strayed away from the pack in an unfortunate incident we will be striving not to repeat," she said.

"The dogs strayed from where the scented trail had been laid on the other side of a woodland and as soon as it was realised a member of the hunt went to round them up.

"I did not go to the other side of the wood so I don't know exactly what happened, but it is sometimes the case that dogs can be distracted by, and chase, small animals, such as a fox.

"You can't stop more than 100 years of inbred instinct."

The investigation has come at a time when fox hunting is once again being debated by politicians on both a national and European level.

In a post on his website, Lincolnshire MEP Roger Helmer said a recent decision by UNESCO to recognise falconry – the hunting of small game with trained birds of prey – as "an intangible cultural heritage of humanity" conferred in turn a status to hunting in general.

"In the East Midlands, in particular, hunting is woven into the fabric of rural life, an unbroken thread of culture that binds man to his natural world," he said.

"And if falconry is an intangible cultural heritage, then undoubtedly English fox-hunting is as well."

But a spokesman for vegetarian campaign group Viva, Justin Kerswell, who have been vocal in their opposition to plans for a super-dairy at Nocton, said such comments "should be of concern to anyone in Lincolnshire who has an interest in the welfare of animals".

"Pro-hunt politicians know that they will not win a vote on hunting, so it is worrying that some might be looking for other ways to bring back this barbaric practice," he said.

Figures released by the Ministry of Justice in September showed a surge in convictions under the Hunting Act, with 57 people convicted in 2009 – almost double the 33 in 2008.

But Lincolnshire Police wildlife crime officer PC Nigel Lound said that in reality fox hunting was the lesser of the hunting issues in the county.

"We receive on average one call per month about alleged fox hunting, with most being people seeing hunts exercising their hounds and assuming they're chasing a fox," he said.

"What is actually a much bigger issue is hare coursing – we've had 800 complaints since September of people setting dogs on everything from rabbits to badgers."

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  • Ian_Harrison  |  February 05 2014, 9:14PM

    A hunt rode through my village (Kirkby Underwood) on the 4th of February and we had hounds run through several gardens. I'm trying to find out which hunt it was.

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    Michael, lincoln  |  January 27 2011, 6:00PM

    I did not say that I would not eat them! fat knacker and horse sandwich anyone? it has a hound dressing.

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    adam, nr coleby  |  January 26 2011, 4:34PM

    @Michael, lincoln you say if a hound comes on your land you will shoot it followed by horse and rider......then say if your not going to eat it dont kill it?........sorry couldnt resist pointing that out.

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    adam, nr coleby  |  January 26 2011, 4:29PM

    @just me. i have just read your comment about farmers being the most damaging thing to wildlife......with reference to your comments on pesticides killing all the birds etc.... balls. i am a farmer we regularly spray pesticides and i cant remember the last time i saw a dead bird on the floor. oh yes i can i was a partridge killed by a sparrow hawk. im sorry but this arguement is based not on information. it maybe based on what YOU know. but sadly you are misinformed...... farmers in the past yes have removed hedgerows i do not disagree with this. BUT we do now plant more hedgerows, we maintain the ecosystems in the countryside. we on our farm alone have increased the diversity of song birds and game birds, this is nearly entirely due to predator control. notice control not eradication. oh and if you want to see song birds try opening your eyes? the RSPB have done a survey recently on our small farm, over 50 diff species several on the endangered list. so our pesticides dont seem to be doing alot of harm. we are inundated with rabbits/ hares/rats/hedgehogs/voles/harvest mice they also seem to be thriving dispite the pesticides. we also have several kestrels and barn owls, little owls and tawney owls. all top of their foos chain.....so if anything was going to die out it would be them before the song birds, as poison accumulates up the food chain.....and back to the hedgrows being ripped out. i would like to think as an industry the forestry people are probably the only one that does more to plant trees.........please before spouting off and insulting a large amount of people in one statement, please do some reasearch.

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    Steve, Saxilby  |  January 26 2011, 2:16PM

    To talk about fox hunting whilst making comparisons with killing animals in a slaughter house or even the shooting of game has no validity, there is a fundamental difference. You can't eat a fox so it is killed purely for pleasure. The argument that the fox is a pest and needs controlling is incidental and not the reason people hunt but often used an excuse for doing so. I am sure most huntsmen are not inherently cruel and would brake to avoid a Fox or any other animal on the road, I am equally sure the majority of hunts don't mind if the fox escapes as long as they have a good run but you have to ask why does the Terrier man come along and dig the fox out when it goes to ground and throws it to the hounds? This ritual does hunting no favours at all in the eyes of any normal thinking person. The other side lets¿ it¿s self down by referring to all huntsmen as Toffs, again totally irrelevant and gives the impression they have another agenda which distracts from their argument.

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    doggy1, lincoln  |  January 26 2011, 12:55AM

    If I go out and cannot control my dog, I would be heavily fined! whats the difference? they allegedly could not control their dogs (forget hounds and packs they are dogs not on a lead) fine the idiots and take their gee gee's away from them

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    Michael, lincoln  |  January 26 2011, 12:51AM

    Pete needs to get over HIMSELF, there is reported incidents of children and pets mauled by hounds. and the first hound to bound over my small holding will be shot, followed by the horse and rider, If you cannot eat it do not kill it, Pete you are a prat.

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    Paul Timpson, The North  |  January 25 2011, 11:40PM

    "You can't stop more than 100 years of inbred instinct." - Is she on about the hunting and shooting fraternity?

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    Lady Christine Brocklebank, Fulbeck  |  January 25 2011, 10:35PM

    If those that break the law are not brought to justice then what is the point of any law and why should any one live within the law if there are those that are allowed to break it. How can the law demand a speeding fine or a parking fine when it allows the hunt to chase and tear apart a living creature?

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    Iain, Lincoln  |  January 25 2011, 10:13PM

    The farmer is the worst damaging thing to wild life,They spray the fields with pesticides and the birds drink from the stems of plants and other animals also get covered from head to toe with the poison by foraging through the crops that have been sprayed then grooming their self s thus they are poisoned. Also they have taken all the hedge rows up to gain more acreage for growing leaving the birds now where to nest or feed.That is why you don't see so many song birds these days. Just me...... If people where prepared to pay a fair price for there food then there wouldnt be a need to mass produce in the way we do, But because people want to go to Lydl and pay 3p for a lb of carrots the farmer has to make ends meet......

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