Login Register
 °

Sleaford construction company lands £9.5m energy plant contract

By Sleaford Target  |  Posted: June 28, 2012

Sleaford plant

SLEAFORD RENEWABLE ENERGY PLANT: The plant is expected to provide heat for around 65,000 homes.

Comments (0)

A CONSTRUCTION company has been awarded a £9.5m contract to work on the new Renewable Energy Plant in Sleaford.

North Midland Construction plc (NMC) was awarded the contract by Burmeister Wain Scandinavian Contractor A/S for the second straw fired power station in the UK.

The new plant will comprise of two 0.75 acre straw barns, a woodchip import facility, combined turbine and boiler halls plus administration buildings. The external works for the 10 acre site include sustainable drainage solutions, roads and HV export facilities for the generated power, with surplus heat piped to Sleaford’s public swimming pool and some other community facilities in the town.

Business development director at NMC, Stuart Campbell, said, “We’re delighted to be involved in such an innovative project that will have a positive impact not just on the environment but also on the local economy through the creation of jobs in the plant and through the supply chain. We have experience working with the power industry and renewable energy projects are a fast growing area for our business as alternative energy remains high on the national infrastructure agenda.”

The Sleaford Renewable Energy Plant will use straw, sourced mainly from local farms, to generate 38MW of recovered energy which is enough to provide power and heat for around 65,000 homes.

The plant will save around 250,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions every year. Ash from the plant will be recycled for use as fertiliser on farmland. The new Renewable Energy Plant is also expected to create 80 permanent jobs and will provide local straw contracts of up to £10m per year. The plant is due to be operational in 2014.

North Kesteven District Council leader Councillor Marion Brighton said: “The transfer of free heat will benefit all residents in Sleaford and the surrounding areas, as well as visitors to the town’s leisure facilities. It is part of a significant package of benefits, which includes in excess of £200,000 of fresh investment to support our long-term plans to make the District a more sustainable place to live.

“It is important to recognise that the heat being transferred, initially to these three leisure facilities, is a positive by-product of the generation of green electricity, making a key contribution to the Council’s broader aspirations for the reduction of carbon emissions from public buildings.”

Read more from Lincolnshire Echo

Do you have something to say? Leave your comment here...

max 4000 characters
  • ranza1  |  June 29 2012, 5:07PM

    "snoddybag"-As Stated by M_C_Donald the water is mainly circulated within the plant and reused so usage is minimised, heat exchangers are used for useful energy transfer but sadly the heat dissipated in the condensers is deliberately wasted . They fulfil the function of cooling towers on current power plants. The main water concern is the contaminated water in the emissions. With fuel specified to contain up to 25% water the plant will create some 150,000 plus litres per day. Biomass plant operators confirm the pollution in the flue gases cause the water to be toxic and acidic which questions where it will impact especially when we are aware of the emissions inversion problems associated with biomass combustion. The claims of free heat should be evaluated against the actual costs , the £millions to be paid in subsidising the burning of straw plus heat transfer infrastructure and external costs must be considered. The Environment Agency detail that combustion of straw for energy can result in GHG impact 35% higher than equivalent fossil fuel, fossil fuel is burned in the process and involved in fertiliser production. This sadly negates any claims of the process being carbon neutral. A recent Gov. Report details the need for a 60% increase in the plough back of agricultural waste to condition the soil and reduce reliance on fossil fuel derived fertilisers which raises sustainability concerns for straw . Drax detail need for large quantities of biomass that can be pelleted which adds to sustainability concerns and indicates the need to evaluate the transport impact. The impact of HGV transport hauling half tonne Hesston bales against high energy density pellets. The various reports on this plant indicate a rapid increase in straw cost which adds to concerns. The £9.5 million NMC contract is good news but is only a small percentage of the total cost which raises the question of where the bulk of the investment is going ? The claims made for renewable energy, carbon neutral, green and clean surely all need serious scrutiny in order to establish the truth on actual impact. We are aware there are truly green, clean and environmentally friendly processes available. Rgds Brian Wilson

    |   1
  • Lincsl200  |  June 29 2012, 3:18PM

    @ M_C_Donald. When plants grow they absorb CO2 from the atmosphere and use it to make carbohydrates. When the carbohydrates (straw, wood) are burnt CO2 is released back into the atmosphere. The amount released (including carbon left in the ash) is no greater than what was fixed during growth. Therefore there is a net zero addition of CO2 to the atmosphere...... So its Carbon Neutral, Not green - Green suggests that no CO2 is produced during energy production.

    |   -3
  • M_C_Donald  |  June 29 2012, 1:01PM

    Snoddy I am not sure but it could be a sealed system. Water is heated and converted to steam, powers the turbines, then passes through a heat exchanger/condenser (this is where the surplus heat is recovered) where it reverts back to liquid water and the cycle starts again. Lincsl200 Green? Your [sic] still burning stuff and pumping co2 in to the atmosphere.... The only thing that makes it "re-newable" is that straw grows so quick it can be easily replaced." When plants grow they absorb CO2 from the atmosphere and use it to make carbohydrates. When the carbohydrates (straw, wood) are burnt CO2 is released back into the atmosphere. The amount released (including carbon left in the ash) is no greater than what was fixed during growth. Therefore there is a net zero addition of CO2 to the atmosphere. When fossil fuels are burnt fossilised carbon is released to the atmosphere as CO2 adding to the net amount in a non-geological timescale. Hope that helps.

    |   2
  • Lincsl200  |  June 29 2012, 8:53AM

    "It is important to recognise that the heat being transferred, initially to these three leisure facilities, is a positive by-product of the generation of green electricity, making a key contribution to the Council's broader aspirations for the reduction of carbon emissions from public buildings" Green? Your still burning stuff and pumping co2 in to the atmosphere.... The only thing that makes it "re-newable" is that straw grows so quick it can be easily replaced.

  • snoddybag  |  June 29 2012, 8:16AM

    This project sounds very good and I wish it well. The only thing that puzzles me is. Where will the water come from that is to be turned into steam to turn the turbines that turn the generators? With the nearest natural water supply that I know of is the River Slea. Of which dries up now and then. Maybe someone can enlighten me with the answer.

  • Adrian1208  |  June 28 2012, 6:55PM

    Well done North Midland Construction for gaining the contract, it good to see that a local contractor is to do the building work!!!! Congratulations NMC

    |   3

      YOUR COMMENTS AWAITING MODERATION

       
       
       

      MORE NEWS HEADLINES