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Taking children to fast food outlets is form of child abuse, says Lincolnshire councillor

By Lincolnshire Echo  |  Posted: September 24, 2012

Obesity
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Fresh calls have been made to reintroduce compulsory cookery lessons into schools in Lincolnshire.

Latest figures reveal one in three children in their last year of primary school are either overweight or obese.

And one county councillor has criticised parents for taking their children to fast food outlets - comparing it to "a form of child abuse."

Almost 24 per cent of children in reception classes in Lincolnshire are overweight or obese, which is above both the East Midlands average of 22.1 per cent and national average 22.6 per cent.

And more than 35 per cent of Year 6 children in the county are overweight or obese. This too is higher than East Midlands average of 32.4 per cent and national average of 33.4 per cent.

Following a presentation to Lincolnshire county councillors on the issue, Independent member Chris Brewis said: "I think incidents of parents taking their children into fast food outlets should be treated as a form of child abuse.

"We, as a council, need to tell these parents they are killing their children.

"Between 70 and 90 per cent of antisocial behaviour in schools is linked to diet. Another big problem is the use of energy drinks. They go against the body's wish to rest. We need to be more direct with our message."

While there has been a successful two per cent drop in overweight or obese children in reception classes in the county since 2010, there has been a 0.3 per cent rise in overweight or obese children in Year 6.

Lincoln has also seen a 10.9 per cent increase in obesity among Year 6 pupils.

Christine Talbot, chairman for the health scrutiny committee at Lincolnshire County Council believes domestic science should be reintroduced.

The subject was scrapped during the Thatcher era in favour of food technology, which focuses more on the processes used to create foods such as frozen pizzas, rather than how to cook. Mrs Talbot said: "A lot of money is being expended on this issue and I am not sure the results are representing that.

"Domestic science should be introduced back into schools and the national curriculum.

"We need to teach children from an early age how to cook proper food once again.

"We need to educate the children on nutrition. They need to know about protein, fat content and more.

"Just forcing people to exercise is no good. From the figures it appears children are weighed in reception, then eat loads before getting weighed again. I propose there is a weigh-day in the middle of that."

Parent of two and boxing trainer Wayne Casement, from Lincoln, said: "There are too many fast food outlets. Parents can't be bothered to cook proper meals and that passes down to the children.

"Other parents are too busy. We live in a fast-paced world now and it's the way life is. It isn't right on the children. Children should be treated from time to time of course - but not every night.

"Teaching domestic science in schools is a good idea."

Across the country, food technology is taught as part of Design and Technology at Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2

In July, the Secretary of State for Education started work on an action plan to ensure children are offered good food in English schools and are educated about food and nutrition.

A Department for Education spokesperson said: "We know that a healthy attitude towards food, developed early, is critical to the health, well-being and good educational attainment of young people.

"It is mandatory for primary schools to teach food technology. We are looking at the role food and cooking plays in schools and how this can help get our children eating well."

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  • eatmygoal  |  September 27 2012, 11:00AM

    Sadly that does seem to be the view of many. A Gastric Bypass seems to be viewed as a right by most bariatric patients.

  • GeorgeSomme  |  September 27 2012, 10:57AM

    I would make a coment but there is a huge Croft carpets advert situated annoyingly over the comment box. Iwill never ever use Croft carpets and will inform all my friends they should keep away.

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  • Roadscource  |  September 27 2012, 10:18AM

    Fair enough. Dont bother exercising to lose weight as there appears to be loads of other highly scientific options available.

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  • eatmygoal  |  September 27 2012, 10:13AM

    2. couple of days ago a chap was having his liver operated on laprascopically. The liver was picked up using a spatula type device, a camera was inserted to the cavity and a sponge was taken down in order to mop away any blood coming from a incission in the liver. The take home message being that the sponge was bone dry in the cavity next to the liver to the left of the stomach, there were no fluids to dampen it. A few sponges were taken down. One of them came back up nearly dry. 3. Depends what you are referring to as stomach muscles? The stomach is essentially a muscle but does not show. If you are referring to the rectus abdominis which gives the six pack shape it pulls the body forward and would give more space to the stomach. Or are you talking about transversus abdominis which compresses internal organs? If you are there is plenty of space for this to be strong and powerful and not stop you from eating plenty. Otherwise gymnasts would frequently be sick when trying to eat like some sort of gastric by pass.

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  • Roadscource  |  September 27 2012, 9:48AM

    Sneer lets look at it again shall we. I said "i train 3 times a week and it makes you LESS hungry and with tighter flatter stomach muscles you eat less because you have less space to put it." So 1. It does not say hunger is related to the amount of space you have to put food. 2. Im sure you will find fluids round internal organs not cavernous vacuums as Whine incorrectly stated and 3. So where will you find the human stomach, behind your left ear?

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  • Mr_Sneer  |  September 26 2012, 9:55PM

    "Numb Chumpy are you really going to side with WHINE when all that they ever post is a copy of others "views and statements" followed by an ill informed derogatory remark with no facts or views of their own to back it up?" How about you back up your assertion that "it makes you LESS hungry and with tighter flatter stomach muscles you eat less because you have less space to put it"? Seems only polite, given that it was you that made it in the first instance. Then when you discover that it is - as anyone with a GCSE in biology could tell you - utter twaddle you may apologise.

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  • Roadscource  |  September 26 2012, 6:31PM

    Numb Chumpy are you really going to side with WHINE when all that they ever post is a copy of others "views and statements" followed by an ill informed derogatory remark with no facts or views of their own to back it up? Their second post now seams to contain some info gleaned from the Web which appears to have taken 2 hours and 1 minute to prepare.

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  • eatmygoal  |  September 26 2012, 5:45PM

    Roadsource is right for the wrong reasons. A good run on the treadmill reduces levels of Ghrelin and peptide YY which cause hunger senstations, as TB78Whine correctly says. Eating is often not about need or what your body is asking for, but desire. That bacon butty is all the more attractive when you have earnt it. The over compensation is where the problems start.

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  • Numb_Chumpy  |  September 26 2012, 4:38PM

    "Ha ha ha ha ha, its the Wine making the usual ludicrous statements with nothing to back it up with whatsoever - not "priceless" as my comment but "useless" as usual lol." Hate to break this to you, but they are actually right and you are actually wrong. Again.

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  • TB78WHlNE  |  September 26 2012, 4:03PM

    "Ha ha ha ha ha, its the Wine making the usual ludicrous statements with nothing to back it up with whatsoever - not "priceless" as my comment but "useless" as usual lol." Well, where do we start? 1. Hunger and appetite are driven by hormones, not 'space'. 2. Overweight people have less space around their internal organs, not more. 3. Your stomach is nowhere near what you incorrectly call 'stomach muscles'. But please, do carry on marinating in your own ignorance - it's no skin off my nose =)

    |   4

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